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Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to ,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, 1,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which 6,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs,

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern. For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

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Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), $946,212,000, of which $477,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which $11,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which $37,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which $697,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $130,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $30,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $35,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $89,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $45,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) $39,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) $4,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which $3,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $45,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $13,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) $73,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) $13,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) $125,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $117,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $4,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) $45,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) $9,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) $68,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) $50,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) $103,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $43,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $12,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $14,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $7,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) $14,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, $247,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $55,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $80,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $14,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $72,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $5,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $35,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $7,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $7,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $10,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) 6,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, ,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), ,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, ,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, ,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, ,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, ,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, ,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, ,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, ,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and ,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) 0,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and ,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed ,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), 6,212,000, of which 7,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which ,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which ,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which 7,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, 0,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which ,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) 5,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) ,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) ,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) ,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) ,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which ,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) ,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) ,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) ,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) ,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) ,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) ,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) ,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) 0,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14)

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern. For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

||

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), $946,212,000, of which $477,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which $11,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which $37,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which $697,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $130,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $30,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $35,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $89,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $45,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) $39,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) $4,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which $3,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $45,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $13,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) $73,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) $13,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) $125,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $117,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $4,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) $45,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) $9,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) $68,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) $50,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) $103,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $43,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $12,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $14,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $7,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) $14,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, $247,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $55,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $80,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $14,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $72,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $5,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $35,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $7,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $7,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $10,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) 0,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) ,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17)

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern. For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

||

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), $946,212,000, of which $477,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which $11,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which $37,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which $697,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $130,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $30,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $35,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $89,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $45,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) $39,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) $4,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which $3,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $45,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $13,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) $73,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) $13,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) $125,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $117,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $4,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) $45,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) $9,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) $68,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) $50,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) $103,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $43,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $12,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $14,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $7,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) $14,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, $247,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $55,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $80,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $14,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $72,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $5,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $35,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $7,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $7,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $10,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, ,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) ,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which ,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) ,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which ,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) ,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which ,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) ,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) ,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) ,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) ,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern. For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

||

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), $946,212,000, of which $477,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which $11,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which $37,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which $697,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $130,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $30,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $35,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $89,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $45,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) $39,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) $4,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which $3,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $45,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $13,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) $73,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) $13,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) $125,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $117,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $4,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) $45,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) $9,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) $68,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) $50,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) $103,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $43,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $12,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $14,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $7,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) $14,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, $247,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $55,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $80,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $14,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $72,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $5,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $35,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $7,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $7,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $10,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7)

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern. For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

||

Consolidation is used in technical analysis to describe the movement of a stock's price within a well-defined pattern of trading levels.

Consolidation is generally regarded as a period of indecision, which ends when the price of the asset moves above or below the prices in the trading pattern.

For necessary expenses of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, including up to $30,000 for representation allowances and for expenses pursuant to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 5601 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $481,500,000, to remain available until expended, of which $326,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); and other programs, $1,258,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $396,000,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $7,500,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $6,500,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $2,500,000 is for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review, $10,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to States and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $20,000,000 is for the sole purpose of providing reimbursement of extraordinary law enforcement and related costs directly associated with protection of the President-elect incurred from November 9, 2016 until the inauguration of the President-elect as President: Provided, That reimbursement under the foregoing shall be provided only for costs that a State or local agency can document as being over and above normal law enforcement operations and directly attributable to the provision of protection described herein: Provided further, That section 154 of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114–223), as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114–254), is amended by inserting after “$7,000,000” the following: “, to remain available until September 30, 2017,”; (2) $210,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $16,300,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 3796dd) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (42 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses.

4085), $946,212,000, of which $477,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which $11,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which $37,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which $697,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $130,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for costs related to construction of new facilities: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 10601), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $30,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,000,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $35,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $89,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $45,500,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; (2) $39,500,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention; and (3) $4,000,000 is for activities to strengthen and enhance the practice of forensic sciences, of which $3,000,000 is for transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support Scientific Area Committees. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $45,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $13,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (5) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (6) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (7) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) $73,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) $13,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) $125,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $117,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $4,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) $45,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) $9,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) $68,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) $50,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) $103,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $43,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $12,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $14,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $7,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) $14,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, $247,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $55,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $80,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $14,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $72,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $5,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $35,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $7,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $7,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $10,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (8) ,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than ,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (9) ,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (10) 5,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) 7,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) ,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) ,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (11) ,000,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (12) ,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (13) ,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed ,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, ,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and ,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to ,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to ,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (14) ,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (15) ,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which ,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, ,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and ,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (16) 3,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) ,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) ,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) ,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) ,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; and (E) ,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 5771 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other juvenile justice programs, 7,000,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) ,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, 0,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) ,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) ,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) ,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (B) 0,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (C) ,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; and (D) ,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; (4) ,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) ,500,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) ,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) ,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (4) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 3796dd–3(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed 5,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, ,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, ,000,000 is for the collaborative reform model of technical assistance in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph ,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, ,500,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) ,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) ,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

We believe this transaction sets us apart from peer companies on the basis of the size and quality of our acreage position in what we consider the most desirable basin in the country." , Co-CEOs of Double Eagle, commented, "With many possible paths for the next phase in the evolution and development of Double Eagle's assets, we were excited to negotiate a transaction with Parsley given the Company's history of efficient growth and of enhancing the value of its asset base through the same types of creative transactions it took to build Double Eagle's portfolio." and Double Eagle's other financial sponsors, Post Oak Energy Capital and Magnetar Capital, we look forward to working with Parsley Energy as the Company develops the prized assets the Double Eagle team has expertly assembled in the true core of the Midland Basin.

Parsley intends to increase drilling and completion activity on the Company's expanded asset base and, as a result, is updating 2017 capital plans and operating guidance to reflect increased capital investment and associated production growth.

Herein Parsley also provides updates on preliminary 4Q16 and full-year 2016 operational results, year-end 2016 reserves, and recent hedging activity.

student loan is subject to completion of a loan application/consumer credit agreement, verification of application information, credit qualification, and a benefit to borrower determination.

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